“It is another beautiful evening here at the Red Pony bar and continual soirée, how can I help you?” ― Craig Johnson, The Cold Dish

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“in the cupboard sits my bottle
like a dwarf waiting to scratch out my prayers.
I drink and cough like some idiot at a symphony,
sunlight and maddened birds are everywhere,
the phone rings gamboling its sound
against the odds of the crooked sea;
I drink deeply and evenly now,
I drink to paradise
and death
and the lie of love.”

—Charles Bukowski, “Soirée”

. “Our knowledge is a little island in a great ocean of nonknowledge.” – Isaac Bashevis Singer

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00000 beach road

“To stand at the edge of the sea, to sense the ebb and flow of the tides, to feel the breath of a mist moving over a great salt marsh, to watch the flight of shore birds that have swept up and down the surf lines of the continents for untold thousands of year, to see the running of the old eels and the young shad to the sea, is to have knowledge of things that are as nearly eternal as any earthly life can be.” – Rachel Carson

(The one who enters a Turkish bath sweats.)

Used to point out that one’s actions determine the consequences and therefore one should not complain about them later.0 illustratedcatal1883muse_0193

Güneş balçıkla sıvanmaz.
o Literal translation: Sun cannot be daubed using wet clay.
o Meaning: One cannot conceal something very obvious whatever they try.

What she wants in up and down, she hath in round about.

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The merry-go-round had a centre post of cast iron, reddened a little by the salt air, and of a certain ornateness: not striking enough to attract a casual eye, but still, to an eye concentrated upon it (to the eye, say, of a lover of the merry-go-round, a child) intriguing in its transitions. The post began as a square pillar, formed rings, continued as a fluted column, suddenly bulged like a diseased tree with an excresence of iron leaves, narrowed to a peak like the top of a pepperpot, and at last ended, very high in the sky, with an iron ball. In the bulge where the leaves were, was an iron collar. From this collar eight iron stays hung down, supporting the narrow wooden octagonal seat of the merry-go-round, which circled the knees of the centre post rather after the style of a crinoline. The planks were polished by the bottoms of children, and on every one of the stays was a small unrusted section where the hands of adults had grasped and pulled and send the merry-go-round spinning.

RANDOLPH STOW.