This is the step where humility smacks us right between the eyes. It was one thing to write out our inventory for ourselves. As for sharing it with God—if there is a God, He’d know all about us anyway.

 But we’re also being asked to share our inventory with another person! This is asking too much! Why can’t we simply assess ourselves and get on with the business of cleaning up our lives?0 0 0 0  0 snowwhitesevendw00whit_0157

More Comments About Step 5

This may be one of the most challenging steps we face in our recovery process, but it can also be one of the most fulfilling in terms of removing us from our isolation. In order to accomplish Step 5, the three-part sharing it endorses must take place. That is, all of what we discovered about ourselves in our Step 4 inventory is to be freely admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being.

…Because these areas are so sensitive and so very personal, it is important to exercise care in choosing the person or persons with whom we formally share our fifth step. Such individuals should be trustworthy and somewhat detached from the situations about which we will share. For example, one would not usually call on a spouse or immediate family member to hear this confession. In fact, it is quite common to choose a therapist or pastoral counselor for this purpose. Also, such individuals should be compassionate, not condemning.
– Serenity, A Companion for Twelve Step Recovery, p. 45,46

“The chahuiztle is upon us!”

Sounds like a bad omen, right? Well, it is. Chahuiztle is the generic name for some parasites (especially fungi) that infest commercially important crops. The phrase implies that our problems are going from bad to worse and everything will soon go to hell. Some people misspell the phrase as “¡Ya nos cargó el chahuiztle!” which literally means “The chahuiztle is carrying us!” This second phrase is evidently wrong since fungi do not have arms to carry people around. There are, however, some creepy characters that can (metaphorically) carry us to our demise, like the infamous Coco or the Clown

13 phrases only Mexicans understand

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Never contend with one that is foolish, proud, positive, testy, or with a superior, or a clown, in matter of argument.

Thomas Fuller

Arab. — When fate arrives the physician becomes a fool.

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“Albert grunted. “Do you know what happens to lads who ask too many questions?”
Mort thought for a moment.
“No,” he said eventually, “what?”
There was silence.
Then Albert straightened up and said, “Damned if I know. Probably they get answers, and serve ’em right.”
― Terry Pratchett, Mort

“Africa is less a wilderness than a repository of primary and fundamental values, and less a barbaric land than an unfamiliar voice” ~Beryl Markham, “West with the Night”

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A guide is necessary in a strange place ; such the world is — a wilderness where there are bad roads, few wells, storms of sand arise, and the dread of robbers.

Never believe that true prayer consists in mere babbling, reciting so many psalms and vigils, saying your beads while you allow your thoughts to roam. Taubman.

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Method is more important than strength, when you wish to control your enemies. By dropping golden beads near a snake, a crow once managed To have a passer-by kill the snake for the beads.

Longfellow.

“I don’t need a cloak to become invisible.” ― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

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no veil of false excuses, or artful cloaking and colouring of our faults, will disguise from us our true state, if only we never neglect to consult this mirror in sincerity and with earnest prayer.