Category Archives: PROTECTION

Two lovers in the rain have no need of an umbrella. Japanese

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KATHY IN RALEIGH 2011

how many umbrellas or love letters

by Richard James Allen

 

how many umbrellas have I lost in my lifetime – left in the pristine

foyers of yoga centres, in the muddy corners of coffee shops, in the

mysterious worlds that exist under the seats in bus shelters, dangling

like bats off park benches?

 

                                                     I imagine each of these umbrellas, all dead and forgotten now of course, as giant origami love letters, which people I don’t know opened to the plunging sky with delight and relief.

 

looking back, these random forgetfulnesses may have been the major contribution of my life, popping up in the lives of others like the tips of islands emerging in a world where the sea levels are actually dropping to save beautiful but bedraggled shipwrecked wayfarers in a lost play by a man still named Bill.

 

And then

 

the rainless dawn.

Commended in the 2013 Dangerously Poetic Byron Bay Writers Festival Poetry Prize.

http://www.writreview.com.au/how-many-umbrellas-or-love-letters-by-richard-james-allen.html

Hush my dear, lie still and slumber. Holy Angels guard thy bed! Heavenly blessings without number, gently falling on they head.” – Isaac Watts

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‘Aumākua—Sacred Guardians

The world of the ancient Hawaiians was also rich with spiritual forces that were closely linked to their natural environment. Certain species were considered sacred ‘aumākua, guardian spirits that might be seen in visions or dreams.

This connection to the natural world and these spiritual beliefs continue today—the Hawaiian culture is a living culture, and the ancient philosophies still resonate in the daily lives of Hawaiians.

As personal or family gods, ‘aumākua may take on various physical manifestations, becoming incarnate in living animals that appear to warn or protect.

Some ‘aumākua are the ‘io (Buteo solitarius, Hawaiian hawk), manō (shark), pueo (Asio flammeus, short-eared Owl), honu (Chelonia mydas, sea turtle), kōlea (Pluvialis fulva, Pacific golden plover), and hīnālea (Labridae, wrasse), with different species being ‘aumākua to different people or families.

An ancient Hawaiian saying states: “‘Ano lani; ‘ano honua.” (A heavenly nature; an earthly nature.”), which is “said of some ‘aumākua who make themselves visible to loved ones by assuming an earthly form, such as fish, fowl, or animal, yet retain the nature of a god.”

“The knowledge of these kāhuna of ancient times was remarkable. It is possible that the source of their knowledge was from observation of the clouds in the heavens, and at times from dreams, and they spoke of what was revealed to them by the ‘aumakua in whom they had faith and who disclosed to them the signs in the heavens and events to come.”

Stephen Langhern Desha Sr

http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/aum257kuasacred-guardians.asp

I cannot think of any need in childhood as strong as the need for a father’s protection. Sigmund Freud

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Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valour and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you. 

Hafiz

I have never yet met a healthy person who worried very much about his health, or a really good person who worried much about his own soul. John B. S. Haldane

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Place Your Healing Touch In My Hands 

Unknown Author 

Help me as I care  for my patients today, 
Be there with me, 
O Lord, I pray 
Make my words kind   
it means so much
And in my hands place 
Your healing touch 
Let your love shine  through all that I do, 
So those in need  may hear and feel You. 

http://www.nursesareangels.com/nursing_poems.htm

Sentimental irony is a dog that bays at the moon while pissing on graves. Karl Kraus

http://www.lexiyoga.com/moon-quotes

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FOTO  John May’s dog at a Raleigh Rumbling. 

 

The Vagabond And His Dog.

 http://www.wolfweb.com.au/acd/vagabond.htm

By Robert X Leeds.It was another Christmas day
And God looked out to see
What scripture promise came to pass,
What promise would not be.

Andturning aside, HE turned his eyes
To those who’d dwell inside,
To those who’d warm by Heaven’s hearth
And those who’d be denied.

And HE saw a man at St. Peter’s gate,
A mongrel dog at his feet,
And a line that reached to the dark of night
As far as the eye could see.

And St. Peter looked at the disheveled two
And challenged the wretch to say,
What deeds he’d done, what praise he’d won
To walk in Heaven’s way.

And the vagrant stood in his shabby robe
And not one word he spoke,
As though he heard not a single word
This man in the tattered cloak.

 

“What deeds have you done to think you’ve won
The grace of Heaven’s line?
What honors earned? What evils spurned?
Pray help me be inclined.”
 

But the wretched soul and his shepherd hound
Stayed on without a sound
As though no deed could come to mind,
As though no reason found.

“Can you not find one deed so fine,
To merit entrance here?
Can none attest some honored quest,
A challenge still unclear?”

And still he stood and but held the leash
That stayed the mongrel hound.
Until he knelt to feel the ground
And kiss the furry crown.

As love was cast in skin and bone,
He held the dog around,
And Heaven watched and Heaven judged
This vagabond and his hound.

“What seeds were sowed that a flower’d grow
When you’d depart the scene?
A single tree? One slave made free?
One clean and shining sea?

Was not one life made free of strife
Along the path you strolled?
Was not one child encouraged to smile?
No good that can be told?”

And all looked on at the vagabond
Who held the unkempt hound.
But not one voice to sway the choice,
No plaintiff voice was found.

when at last, his patience past,
St. Peter bid unkind
And motioned on to the dark beyond,
“No reason you can find?”

“Not one but simple virtue be
That all of us may see?
Not one redeeming act of faith
Did bring you here to me?

In all your time can you not find
One voice for yours to plea?
In all your time can you not find
One voice to vouch for thee?”

And now at last his time though past,
The vagabond turned to speak;
And his eyes were filled with tears that spilled
And coursed the craggy cheeks.

And from his heart the speech did start
To argue not his sake,
But to plead the cause of the mongrel dog,
That lay in Heaven’s wake.

“Perhaps it ain’t for me to see
The paradise within.
I was a simple soul on earth
This hound’s my only kin.

But if the children’s smiles count,
His cup’s filled to the brim.
Oh, I can vouch for this hound, your grace.
I can vouch for him.

You should’ a seen them laugh and run
When he was all their game.
You should’ a seen the love he gave
And never once complain.

And when the tide of time arose
And naught was there to eat,
He shared the taste of an empty plate
And stayed at these failing feet.

It ain’t for me,” he whispered soft,
“It ain’t for me I ask.
But don’t deprive this poor old hound
For what his master lacks.

If caring and sharing and loyalty
Are virtues of your size,
Consider one who lacks of none,
Let Heaven be his prize.

It matters not what comes of me,
Or what may come about.
But it just ain’t fair. It wouldn’t be fair
To keep my poor hound out.

No friend has ever been so true.
No man has walked a line,
Who never strayed, but not this dog,
This hound that I call mine.”

His fingers stroked the shaggy coat
And the dog licked back the hand;
And as much was said in the silence there,
Than since God’s quest began.

And then abrupt, the hound looked up
And labored with its head
To lick this face of human grace,
This man of tattered thread.

And suddenly a calm would be
That tethered every sound.
And a warm breeze blew that embraced the two,
This vagabond and his hound.

And St. Peter turned to the mist beyond
And paused with uplifted head.
To heed the voice of Almighty God
And to do as HE has said.

I’ve set the task and I have asked
For virtues held and shared.
To dwell in a world of every kind
And for every kind have cared.

And now I’ve seen dimensions dreamed
That seldom I’ve seen before,
A simple man and his faithful hound,
Denied at my own door?”

With pen in hand, St. Peter began
To enter on his list,
The names of those whom God had chosen
To dwell in Heaven’s bliss.

And one belonged to a vagabond
And the other he called his kin;
The man who vouched for an old hound dog
And the hound dog who vouched for him.

Submitted by John Chandler

http://www.wolfweb.com.au/acd/vagabond.htm

Two should stay together when crossing a ford.

Is treasa dithis a’ dol thar àn àtha na fad’ o chèile.

AUNT AND NIECE

“Life will break you. Nobody can protect you from that, and living alone won’t either, for solitude will also break you with its yearning. You have to love. You have to feel. It is the reason you are here on earth. You are here to risk your heart. You are here to be swallowed up. And when it happens that you are broken, or betrayed, or left, or hurt, or death brushes near, let yourself sit by an apple tree and listen to the apples falling all around you in heaps, wasting their sweetness. Tell yourself you tasted as many as you could.” 

― Louise Erdrich, The Painted Drum LP

Because all little girls deserve to be protected. Even the daughters of douche bags.”

― Kimberly Wollenburg, Crystal Clean: A mother’s struggle with meth addiction and recovery

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A girl without a mother is like a mountain with no paths; a girl without a father is like a mountain with no streams. 

Kurdish Proverb

Love is enough. Love does conquer all. Love really does always protect, trust, hope, persevere.

― Willow Aster, True Love Story

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“The only way that we can protect each other is if we are together. If we face things together. If we trust each other.”

― Cassandra Clare, City of Lost Souls

This shall be home, where danger was my cradle, and all we have learned will guard us!

― Brian W. Aldiss, The Long Afternoon of Earth

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In my age, as in my youth, night brings me many a deep remorse. I realize that from the cradle up I have been like the rest of the race–never quite sane in the night.
– Mark Twain’s Autobiography

Sometimes when walls seem enemies, and sleep Given to others like a cruel jest Sent for my mocking, I, being mad for rest, Creep out all lonely past the huddled sheep

Amelie Rives. 1863-1945.

http://oldpoetry.com/opoem/65229-Amelie-Rives-Abandonment

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"Dai nemici mi guardo io, dagli amici mi guardi Iddio!"
"I (can) protect myself from my enemies; may God protect me from my friends!"

http://my.lifeinitaly.com/f31/easy-read-italian-proverbs-5707.html

FOTO – raleigh tip