Category Archives: TALKING AND SPEAKING

Speak, parrot, speak, flamboyant popinjay! Speak, though like me you’ve nothing new to say. A.D. HOPE

 

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The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Sunday 8 January 1804

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW - 1803 - 1842), Sunday 8 January 1804

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Beautiful discourse is rarer than emerald ~ yet it can be found among the servant girls at the grindstones. Egyptian 

http://afritorial.com/the-best-72-african-wise-proverbs/

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Life is like a grindstone, whether it grinds him down or polishes him depends on the stuff he is made of.

http://www.brownielocks.com/folksayings.html

Proverbs 10:8 ESV : The wise of heart will receive commandments, but a babbling fool will come to ruin.

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Language is an echo of our need to communicate, which is why it exists. I’ve never been interested in going totally beyond meaning, because there’s no point in writing. That’s not what poems are about, you might as well publish a leaf or a rock. But I am interested in the tensions you get when you go beyond conventionally expected meaning and come back again.   JOHN TRANTER. 

Speak when you are angry and you will make the best speech you will ever regret. AMBROSE BIERCE, The Devil’s Dictionary

 

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“If you don’t figure out what is at your core, what you stand for, and what ultimately motivates you, you’ll always second-guess yourself. You’ll always have regrets. Uncover your core values and use them as a template to test decisions in your life.” 


Jim Hayhurst, Sr.

http://www.wow4u.com/regretpoems/

“Some people drink from the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle.”

Robert Anthony

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foto archibald fountain in sydney’s hyde park australia

You may not have very much sense. But if you have enough to keep your mouth shut and look wise, it will not be long before you acquire a wide reputation as a fountain of Wisdom.

ROBERT ELLIOTT GONZALES, Poems and Paragraphs

Read more at http://www.notable-quotes.com/w/wisdom_quotes.html#VOARsEZtUA5gGIo6.99

Don’t make love by the garden gate, love is blind but the neighbors ain’t

http://www.brownielocks.com/lovequotes.html

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“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing 
and rightdoing there is a field.
I’ll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass
the world is too full to talk about.” 
― Rumi

Scheherazade had inherited the seven baskets of talk, I should have added that she put them out at compound interest until they amounted to seventy-seven.

EDGAR ALLEN POE

http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/1002Scheherazade.html

 

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“Stories are masks of God.

That’s a story, too, of course. I made it up, in collaborations with Joseph Campbell and Scheherazade, Jesus and the Buddha and the Brother’s Grimm.

Stories show us how to bear the unbearable, approach the unapproachable, conceive the inconceiveable. Stories provide meaning, texture, layers and layers of truth.

Stories can also trivialize. Offered indelicately, taken too literally, stories become reductionist tools, rendering things neat and therefore false. Even as we must revere and cherish the masks we variously create, Campbell reminds us, we must not mistake the masks of God for God.

So it seemes to me that one of the most vital things we can teach our children is how to be storytellers. How to tell stories that are rigorously, insistently, beautifully true. And how to believe them.”

― Melanie Tem, The Man on the Ceiling

I must follow them. I am their leader.

– Andrew Bonar Law, 1858-1923

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I come in peace, I didn’t bring artillery.  But I am pleading with you with tears in my eyes.

Marine General James Mattis, to Iraqi tribal leaders

He talked with more claret than clarity.

susan ertz

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“How do I feel today? I feel as unfit as an unfiddle,
And it is the result of a certain turbulence in the mind and an uncertain burbulence in the middle.
What was it, anyway, that angry thing that flew at me?
I am unused to banshees crying Boo at me.
Your wife can’t be a banshee—
Or can she?”

― Ogden Nash, Private Dining-room and Other New Verses

The time has come,” the walrus said, “to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships – and sealing wax – of cabbages and kings.

Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

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“Through the Looking Glass” by Lewis Carroll.
The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright —
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done —
‘It’s very rude of him.’ she said,
‘To come and spoil the fun!’

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead —
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand:
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
‘If this were only cleared away,’
They said, ‘it would be grand.’

‘If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year,
Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,
‘That they could get it clear?’
‘l doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

‘O Oysters, come and walk with us!
The Walrus did beseech.
‘A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each.’

The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head —
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

Out four young Oysters hurried up.
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat —
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn’t any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more —
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

‘The time has come,’ the Walrus said,
‘To talk of many things:
Of shoes — and ships — and sealing wax —
Of cabbages — and kings —
And why the sea is boiling hot —
And whether pigs have wings.’

‘But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,
‘Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!’
‘No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.

‘A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,
‘Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed —
Now, if you’re ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed.’

‘But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
‘After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!’
‘The night is fine,’ the Walrus said,
‘Do you admire the view?’

‘It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
‘Cut us another slice-
I wish you were not quite so deaf-
I’ve had to ask you twice!’

‘It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,
‘To play them such a trick.
After we’ve brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
‘The butter’s spread too thick!’

‘I weep for you,’the Walrus said:
‘I deeply sympathize.’
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

‘O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,
‘You’ve had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?’
But answer came there none —
And this was scarcely odd, because
They’d eaten every one.

Talk about it only enough to do it. Dream about it only enough to feel it. Think about it only enough to understand it. Contemplate it only enough to be it.”

― Jean Toomer

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There is nothing more depressing,
than having everything,
and still feeling sad.
– Janet Jackson

If you want to talk about open mindedness, take off your clothes.

– Michael E. Maconnell

http://www.clothesfree.com/quotes.html

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“Many will rant and rave against the garment fate has woven for them, but they pick it up and don it all the same, and most wear it to the end of their days. You… you would rather go naked into the storm.”

― Robin Hobb, Ship of Magic

Bad news goes about in clogs, Good news in stockinged feet.

Welsh Proverb

 

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The time has come,” the walrus said, “to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships – and sealing wax – of cabbages and kings”
― Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

A gossip is one who talks to you about others; a bore is one who talks to you about himself; and a brilliant conversationalist is one who talks to you about yourself

Lisa Kirk :

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“Certain persons are malicious solely through a necessity for talking. Their conversation, the chat of the drawing-room, gossip of the anteroom, is like those chimneys which consume wood rapidly; they need a great amount of combustibles; and their combustibles are furnished by their neighbours.”

― Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Dammit, that yodel of triumph of yours was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever heard in my life.

Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

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“I tried to utter, but could not. The tongue had got all tangled up with the uvula, and the brain seemed paralyzed. I was feeling the same stunned feeling which, I imagine, Chichester Clam must have felt as the door of the potting shed slammed and he heard Boko starting to yodel without — a nightmare sensation of being but a helpless pawn in the hands of Fate.”

― P.G. Wodehouse

“Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.” Robert A. Heinlein

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“I wash my hands of those who imagine chattering to be knowledge, silence to be ignorance, and affection to be art.”

Kahlil Gibran