Category Archives: DISCERNMENT

“An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it makes a better soup.” ― H.L. Mencken, A Book of Burlesques

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BAUDELAIRE
Many a flower regretfully
Exhales perfume soft as secrets
In a profound solitude.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Saturday 4 September 1937,

1 1 1 1 1 The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW - 1842 - 1954), Saturday 4 September 1937,

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The precious porcelain of human clay.

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Frances Padorr Brent

Porcelain Blue Boat

Nothing is this water
broken by my eagerness.

Tangled string
now what have I done?

Silence      engine
at the bottom of the glass.

Flat
tin voice of the deaf.

http://jacketmagazine.com/13/brent-porcelain.html

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The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Saturday 2 October 1937

1 1 1 1 The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW - 1842 - 1954), Saturday 2 October 1937

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I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.

John Adams

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Riches: A dream in the night. Fame: A gull floating on water.

 Read more at http://www.quotesworthrepeating.com/quote-by/c-quote-by/chinese-proverb/page/3/#KQrPAwCgfiob3F3O.99

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Ye who know the Lone Trail fain would follow it, 
Through it lead to glory or the darkness of the pit. 
Ye who take the Lone Trail, bid your love good-bye; 
The Lone Trail, the Lone Trail follow till you die. 
The trails of the world be countless, and most of the trails be tried; 
You tread on the heels of the many, till you come where the ways divide; 
And one lies safe in the sunlight, and the other is dreary and wan, 
Yet you look aslant at the Lone Trail, and the Lone Trail lures you on. 
And somehow you’re sick of the highway, with its noise and its easy needs, 
And sometimes it leads to the desert, and the tongue swells out of the mouth, 
And you stagger blind to the mirage, to die in the mocking drought. 
And sometimes it leads to the mountain, to the light of the lone camp-fire, 
And you gnaw your belt in the anguish of hunger-goaded desire. 
And sometimes it leads to the Southland, to the swamp where the orchid glows, 
And you rave to your grave with the fever, and they rob the corpse for its clothes. 
And sometimes it leads to the Northland, and the scurvy softens your bones, 
And your flesh dints in like putty, and you spit out your teeth like stones. 
And sometimes it leads to a coral reef in the wash of a weedy sea, 
And you sit and stare at the empty glare where the gulls wait greedily. 
And sometimes it leads to an Arctic trail, and the snows where your torn feet freeze, 
And you whittle away the useless clay, and crawl on your hands and knees. 
Often it leads to the dead-pit; always it leads to pain; 
By the bones of your brothers ye know it, but oh, to follow you’re fain. 
By your bones they will follow behind you, till the ways of the world are made plain. 
Bid good-by to sweetheart, bid good-by to friend; 
The Lone Trail, the Lone Trail follow to the end. 
Tarry not, and fear not, chosen of the true;
Lover of the Lone Trail, the Lone Trail waits for you. 

–ROBERT SERVICE, The Lone Trail, 1907

T. S. Eliot I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.

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FRANCIS BEAUMONT (1584-1616).

What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid !
I have heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame,
As if that everyone from whence they came
Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest,
And had resolved to live a fool the rest
Of his dull life.

Letter to Ben Jonson.

Alcohol removes inhibitions – like that scared little mouse who got drunk and shook his whiskers and shouted: “Now bring on that damn cat!”

– Eleanor Early

http://www.my-alcoholic-addict.com/humor.html

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Most people aren’t appreciated enough, and the bravest things we do in our lives are usually known only to ourselves. No one throws ticker tape on the man who chose to be faithful to his wife, on the lawyer who didn’t take the drug money.

– Peggy Noonan

The time has come,” the walrus said, “to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships – and sealing wax – of cabbages and kings.

Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

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“Through the Looking Glass” by Lewis Carroll.
The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright —
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done —
‘It’s very rude of him.’ she said,
‘To come and spoil the fun!’

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead —
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand:
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
‘If this were only cleared away,’
They said, ‘it would be grand.’

‘If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year,
Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,
‘That they could get it clear?’
‘l doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

‘O Oysters, come and walk with us!
The Walrus did beseech.
‘A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each.’

The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head —
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

Out four young Oysters hurried up.
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat —
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn’t any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more —
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

‘The time has come,’ the Walrus said,
‘To talk of many things:
Of shoes — and ships — and sealing wax —
Of cabbages — and kings —
And why the sea is boiling hot —
And whether pigs have wings.’

‘But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,
‘Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!’
‘No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.

‘A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,
‘Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed —
Now, if you’re ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed.’

‘But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
‘After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!’
‘The night is fine,’ the Walrus said,
‘Do you admire the view?’

‘It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
‘Cut us another slice-
I wish you were not quite so deaf-
I’ve had to ask you twice!’

‘It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,
‘To play them such a trick.
After we’ve brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
‘The butter’s spread too thick!’

‘I weep for you,’the Walrus said:
‘I deeply sympathize.’
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

‘O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,
‘You’ve had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?’
But answer came there none —
And this was scarcely odd, because
They’d eaten every one.

Buy no cats in bags. (Belgian)

"The Antiquity of Proverbs: Fifty Familiar Proverbs and Folk Sayings with Annotations and Lists …"

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Did St. Francis really preach to the birds? Whatever for? If he really liked birds he would have done better to preach to the cats.
Rebecca West

http://www.best-quotes-poems.com/cats-quotes.html

foto – black cat in raleigh 2010

Love your neighbour, but don’t pull down the fence. German.

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*’TIS well that ev’ry one should know, Something of his next door neighbour; What are his hours of to and fro? — Habits of life, and trade or labour? For, whatever our love of quiet. And our care to keep aloof, If he’s giv’n to drink and riot, Mischief soon may reach our roof. Peaceful neighbours are a treasure .

Life is not all clear sailing in calm waters.

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HE is the wisest, who has school’d his mind To adopt the current of the ruling wind. Blow whence it will, prepared for all event, With fortune’s dispensations .e’er content. Who with discernment both in time and place, Bends his opinion with a cheerful grace ; To him unknown the troubles which impart The constant fever of the stubborn heart.