Category Archives: WILL

A boy’s will is the wind’s will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.

 

 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow   ‘My LostYouth’, in Putnam’s Monthly Magazine, vol.6,  Aug. Collected in The Courtship of Miles Standish and Other Poems, 1858. In his diary Longfellow notes that these lines are from an ‘old Lapland song’.

http://quotes.yourdictionary.com/wind

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But an old age serene and bright, and lovely as a Lapland night,
shall lead thee to thy grave.

– William Wordsworth

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Linnaeus in Lapland

BY LORINE NIEDECKER

Nothing worth noting
except an Andromeda
with quadrangular shoots—
            the boots
of the people
wet inside: they must swim
to church thru the floods
or be taxed—the blossoms
            from the bosoms
of the leaves
Fog-thick morning—
I see only
where I now walk. I carry
            my clarity
with me.
Hear
where her snow-grave is
the You

            ah you
of mourning doves
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The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 – 1880), Monday 3 May 1880
1 1 1 1 1 1 The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. - 1858 - 1880), Monday 3 May 1880
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What is the point of having free will if one cannot occasionally spit in the eye of destiny?” ― Jim Butcher, White Night

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Gods prefer simple, vicious games, where you Do Not Achieve Transcendence but Go Straight To Oblivion; a key to the understanding of all religion is that a god’s idea of amusement is Snakes and Ladders with greased rungs.”

― Terry Pratchett, Wyrd Sisters

A boy’s will is the wind’s will. – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Kagwaci ka mwana wene nook kahoragia mwaki
            It is always the potato of another family’s boy that extinguishes the fire
The proverb alludes to the custom of roasting potatoes in the embers of a dying fire.
            Nobody calls himself rogue.

http://www.misterseed.com/link%20pages/PROVERBS2.htm

Children have neither past nor future; they enjoy the present. Jean de la Bruyere

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FOTO family in bellingen nsw australia

“My will shall shape my future. Whether I fail or succeed shall be no man’s doing but my own. I am the force; I can clear any obstacle before me or I can be lost in the maze. My choice; my responsibility; win or lose, only I hold the key to my destiny.”
–  Elaine Maxwell

The bull must be taken by the horns

In moments of danger during a bullfight, a strong, expert matador will grabs the bull by the horns and so prevent it from tossing him

http://english.al/letter/b/page/2/

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The marathon is like a bullfight. There are two ways to kill a bull, for instance. There is the easy way, for one. But all the great matadors end up either dead or mauled because for them killing the bull is not nearly as important as how they kill the bull. They always approach the bull at the greatest risk to themselves, and I admire that. In the marathon, likewise, there are two ways to win. There’s the easy way if all you care about is winning. You hang back and risk nothing. Then kick and try to nip the leaders at the end. Or you can push, challenge the others, make it an exciting race, risking everything. Maybe you lose, but as for me, I’d rather run a gutsy race, pushing all the way and lose, then run a conservative, easy race only for a win.


Alberto Salazar

http://www.sportsfeelgoodstories.com/sport-quotes/sports-quotes/running-quotes/

A house has the character of the man who lives in it.

~ Egyptian

http://www.goldenproverbs.com/tp_egyptian_3.html

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“You don’t have to stop thinking and asking questions to believe in God, child. If He’d wanted a flock of eight billion sheep, He wouldn’t have given us opposable thumbs, much less free will.”

― Hillary Jordan, When She Woke

“He felt he was about to experience again some ancient, delicious childhood moment that the steam calliope’s sour hollowness, the stitching hurdy-gurdy accompaniment, and the drum-and-cymbal crash brought almost to the margin of his grasp.”

― Patricia Highsmith, Strangers on a Train

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“We sleep to time’s hurdy-gurdy; we wake, if ever we wake, to the silence of God. And then, when we wake to the deep shores of time uncreated, then when the dazzling dark breaks over the far slopes of time, then it’s time to toss things, like our reason, and our will; then it’s time to break our necks for home.
There are no events but thoughts and the heart’s hard turning, the heart’s slow learning where to love and whom. The rest is merely gossip, and tales for other times.”

― Annie Dillard, Holy the Firm

This is a handy cove, and a pleasant sittyated grog-shop. Much company, mate?”

― Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island

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“There is a point when the anguished soul finally despairs.  A moment in life when the heart, the will, even the spirit crumbles.  Some say that after much grief and drowning in tears, it is possible to pick up the pieces and carefully repair what was shattered. I say nay.  For the chains of despair have no key, and the soul destroyed by that monster can never hope to be unaffected.  There are things done that cannot be undone.”
― Richelle E. Goodrich

Our greediness so often troubles us, making us run after so many things at the same time, that while we too eagerly look after the least, we miss the greatest

http://www.rodneyohebsion.com/quotes-proverbs.htm

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“Let’s just call things what they are. When a man’s love of finery clouds his moral judgement, that is vanity. When he lets a demanding palate make his moral choices, that is gluttony. When he ascribes the divine will to his own whims, that is pride. And when he gets angry at being reminded of animal suffering that his own daily choices might help avoid, that is moral cowardice.”
― Matthew Scully.

Snake to snake, see the leg

http://www.myanmars.net/myanmar-language/myanmar-proverbs.htm

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“Feebleness of will brings about weakness of head, and the abyss, in spite of its horror, comes to fascinate us, as though it were a place of refuge. Terrible danger! For this abyss is within us; this gulf, open like the vast jaws of an infernal serpent bent on devouring us, is in the depth of our own being, and our liberty floats over this void, which is always seeking to swallow it up.”

― Henri-Frédéric Amiel, Amiel’s Journal

“We are not here to fit in, be well balanced, or provide exempla for others. We are here to be eccentric, different, perhaps strange, perhaps merely to add our small piece, our little clunky, chunky selves, to the great mosaic of being. As the gods intended, we are here to become more and more ourselves.”

James Hollis, What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life

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“If he saw two truths that seemed to contradict each other, he would take the two truths and the contradiction along with them. His spiritual sight is stereoscopic, like his physical sight: he sees two different pictures at once and yet sees all the better for that. Thus he has always believed that there was such a thing as fate, but such a thing as free will also. Thus he believed that children were indeed the kingdom of heaven, but nevertheless ought to be obedient to the kingdom of earth. He admired youth because it was young and age because it was not. It is exactly this balance of apparent contradictions that has been the whole buoyancy of the healthy man.”
― G.K. Chesterton

If I told you I’ve worked hard to get where I’m at, I’d be lying, because I have no idea where I am right now.

― Jarod Kintz, This Book is Not for Sale

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“But you see," said Roark quietly, "I have, let’s say, sixty years to live. Most of that time will be spent working. I’ve chosen the work I want to do. If I find no joy in it, then I’m only condemning myself to sixty years of torture. And I can find the joy only if I do my work in the best way possible to me. But the best is a matter of standards—and I set my own standards. I inherit nothing. I stand at the end of no tradition. I may, perhaps, stand at the beginning of one.”

― Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead

Mothers’ Excuses: Mother for me made excuses When I was a little lad; Found some reason for my conduct When it had been very bad. Blamed it on a recent illness Or my nervousness and told Father to be easy with me Every time he had to scold.

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Edgar Albert Guest

1881-1959, written in 1920

http://oldpoetry.com/opoem/32079-Edgar-Albert-Guest-Mothers—Excuses

Francois De La Rochefoucauld.
Nothing is impossible; there are ways that lead to everything, and if we had sufficient will we should always have sufficient means. It is often merely for an excuse that we say things are impossible.

http://quotations.about.com/cs/inspirationquotes/a/Excuses1.htm

foto- raleigh bamboo 2010

A woman accustomed to miscarriages is no longer troubled by them (Keth. 62a; D. 219).Everything, even troubles and misfortunes, is lightened by frequent occurrence. Cf. "Familiarity breeds contempt" and proverb no. 13.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/ajp/ajp11.htm

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Egli e quello che Dio vuole;
E sara quello the Dio vorrà!

“He is what God pleases;
  He shall be what God wills!”

Italian.

http://www.spamula.net/col/archives/2006/02/the_philosophy.html

foto – oddments on raleigh verandah 2010

If you wish to be a king become A wild ass. (Syrian)

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That man is a king who brings himself under sub- jection. "He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh a city. " (Prov. xvi : 32). The power to bring oneself under subjection is best secured in solitude, hence a man becomes a king by separating himself from others and living a hermit’s life. The wild ass keeps away from human habitation, so let men keep away from intercourse with their fellow men if they desire to discipline their wills. The proverb is intended to commend a monastic life.

"Curiosities in Proverbs: A Collection of Unusual Adages, Maxims, Aphorisms, Phrases and Other …"

foto – egret at raleigh

Creole Proverb: The sea breeze blows the pelican where he wants to go.

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http://www.emsah.uq.edu.au/awsr/new_site/awbr_archive/147/Cobby.htm

I drive out to Amoonguna to tell the family he is right

I sit down with his Aunty, round the campfire, in the night

I ask her to explain the pelicans and the meaning of the sign

She laughs and whispers ‘Arrangkwe. 

just 2 pelicans in the sky!’

Ali Cobby Eckermann. little bit long time. Australian Poetry Centre, Balclava, 2009.

An Incisive Indigenous Voice

foto – pelican at iluka december 2009

A nation will fall when there is no direction, but with many advisers there is victory.Proverbs 11:14

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“ When God wills, it rains with every wind." — Which signifies, that every thing is directed by the will of God.

"A dictionary of Spanish proverbs, tr., with illustr. from the Lat., Span …"

foto – fender bass at carool 2008 ilnam winery with izzy foreal.

No one need pray for either rain or death — both will surely come.

"National proverbs: Serbia"

armi nov 09 023

A Midsummer Noon in the Australian Forest

Charles Harpur

NOT a sound disturbs the air,

There is quiet everywhere;

Over plains and over woods

What a mighty stillness broods!

foto – gwydir highway nov 09 en route to armidale from grafton

The wish is father to the thought.

gramma pie 010lynne

In feature films the director is God; in documentary films God is the director.

Alfred Hitchcock. 

Classical and foreign quotations, a polyglot manual of historical and literary sayings, noted passages in poetry and prose, phrases, proverbs, and bons mots;"

foto – nellibell49 09 ulmarra